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Top 100 Facebook Passwords


The Worst Passwords List is an annual list of the 25 most common passwords from each year as produced by internet security firm SplashData.[4] Since 2011, the firm has published the list based on data examined from millions of passwords leaked in data breaches, mostly in North America and Western Europe, over each year. In the 2016 edition, the 25 most common passwords made up more than 10% of the surveyed passwords, with the most common password of 2016, "123456", making up 4%.[5]




top 100 facebook passwords



This report summarizes the findings of the SafetyDetectives research team who collected over 18 million passwords to find the 20 most used, most predictable, and ultimately most hacked passwords all over the world.


Numeric patterns are worldwide favorites when it comes to creating a weak, easy-to-guess password. Increasing (e.g. 123456) or repetitive (e.g. 111111) numeric patterns could be observed in 8 out of the top 10 and 13 out of the top 30 most used passwords.


The overall password trends analyzed from worldwide users match up pretty well with this list, making the most used passwords in the world extremely prone to dictionary attacks. Those users in the US and Spain with these passwords are also extremely susceptible to hacks.


The best and easiest way to achieve all of these things is by using a password management system. A good password manager will create secure passwords for all of your accounts, autofill them when logging in, and have high levels of encryption so no one can steal your information. We recommend a low-cost premium password manager like Dashlane, but any of the best password managers on the market will guarantee your passwords are strong, secure, and protected.


The only solution is to use a different password for every account and make them long and random. I know there's no way you can remember dozens of strong passwords. In fact, the average US internet user is locked out of 10 accounts per month. That's why you absolutely need a password manager.


What's that, you say? You can't afford to buy yet another security tool? In truth, you can't afford not to. The potential hit, financial and otherwise, that could result from using weak passwords could cost you plenty. Never fear. We have tested quite a few password managers that offer free tiers for their popular services.


What's that, you say? You can't afford to buy yet another security tool? In truth, you can't afford not to. The potential hit, financial and otherwise, that could result from using weak passwords could cost you plenty. Never fear. Quite a few password managers offer free tiers for their popular services.


When you put all your passwords into one repository, you'd better be extremely careful to protect that repository. That's where your master password comes in. This password is used to encrypt the contents of your password vault, so it needs to be as strong as possible. On the flip side, it is unlikely you can recover it. Store your master password in a secure place or risk permanently losing access to your password manager.


The point of adding a password manager to your security arsenal is to replace your weak and duplicate passwords with strong, unguessable passwords. But where do you get those strong passwords? Most password managers can generate strong passwords for you and many let you take control of things like password length, and which character sets to use. The very best ones offer a password strength report that eases the process of identifying and fixing poor passwords.


Filling in usernames and passwords automatically isn't so different from filling in other sorts of data in web forms. Many commercial password managers take advantage of this similarity and thereby streamline the process of filling forms with personal data, such as addresses or payment card details. Some password managers also give you some storage space for secure documents, though the allotted storage is typically not sufficient enough to replace a dedicated cloud storage service.


In addition to using your passwords on multiple devices, you may find you want to share certain logins with other users. Most free password managers do not support secure sharing. Very few let you define an inheritor for your passwords, someone who will receive them in the event of your demise.


If you're willing to give up a little something, you can use many for-pay password managers for free. If you see a paid password manager with features you like, check out its conditions. You may be able to get it without paying. For example, some companies let you use all the features of their product for free if you give up syncing across multiple devices. RoboForm is free for use on a single device, with no syncing. Dashlane, too; but it also imposes a limit of 50 passwords for free users and only allows sharing between up to five accounts.


If you fully commit to using a password manager, you'll quickly run up against these limitations. We don't include any free password managers in this list that limit the number of passwords you can create or that can't sync passwords across devices.


Whenever you see an opportunity to NOT require the user to do something, you should take it. And NOT requiring them to either make up or reuse a password is a win-win situation - you don't make them do work and you don't have to worry about the huge expense of dealing with a breach that leaks passwords.


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